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Lentil: Publications and Research from SwissMixIt

Lentil Botanical Information

Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds.

Keywords: polyphenols, lentils, antioxidants, degenerative diseases, health-promoting effects, protein, amino acid, legume, functionality, bioactive peptides, Red lentils, microbiota, colon, short-chain fatty acids, pectin, glycemic response, glycemic index, human trial, acceptability, Diabetes Mellitus, Lentil, Lipid profiles, Blood glucose, Glycemic index, Clinical Trial.

Description and Research Abstract: Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds.

Grain legumes are widely recognized as staple sources of dietary protein worldwide. Lentil seeds are an excellent source of plant-based proteins and represent a viable alternative to animal and soybean proteins for food processing formulations. Lentil proteins provide not only dietary amino acids but are also a source of bioactive peptides that provide health benefits.

Dietary pulses, including lentils, are protein-rich plant foods that are enriched in intestinal health-promoting bioactives, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and phenolic compounds.

Much evidence supports the health benefits of consuming a plant-based diet and increasing the intake of legumes. A high intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes (beans), nuts, and seeds is linked to significantly lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

Lentils contain a plethora of bioactive phytochemicals such as extractable and insoluble-bound phenolics, carotenoids, tocopherols, saponins, phytic acid, and phytosterols, which have been increasingly attributed to the health benefits of lentil consumption in the diet.

Polyphenols are a group of plant metabolites with potent antioxidant properties, which protect against various chronic diseases induced by oxidative stress. Evidence showed that dietary polyphenols have emerged as one of the prominent scientific interests due to their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases in humans. Possible health beneficial effects of polyphenols are measured based on the human consumption and their bioavailability. Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a great source of polyphenol compounds with various health-promoting properties.

Consumption of cooked lentil as a LGI food in breakfast led to reduction of FBS and TC and improvement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients.

The lentil (Lens culinarisL.) is a legume plant, one of the oldest known food crops and medicinal plants. The health benefits of lentil are well known: its consumption reduces the risks of cardiovascular diseases and some cancers. It has a low glycemic food index and is important in the dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus.

Tap water, demineralized water and liquid fertilizer have been activated using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to investigate their benefits for the germination rate and stem elongation rate of lentils from Puy-en-Velay (France). By plasma-activating tap water, we have obtained germination rates as high as 80 percent (instead of 30 percent with tap water).

Lentils are well placed to make a return into western diets; they are a good source of cheap protein, fibre and vitamins. They also contain low levels of fat, cholesterol and sodium. All of these positive features would improve a typical western diet.

Lentil is a highly nutritious legume with an ample quantity of carbohydrates and good amount of proteins, minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fibres.

Preliminary results at this stage indicate that legumes can successfully grow in an aquaponic facility providing very low use of inorganic inputs, low energy and water use but high prospect on food supply growing in such high-tech systems. This opens the prospect that food production could move from the fields even into the heart of cities.

The pro-health action of germinated lentils could be useful to be added with wheat flour in the production of box bread.

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